Artist Entrepreneurs Lead Messy Lives

Table of Contents

Artist Entrepreneurs often lead messy lives. We all know the stereotype of the messy artist. But more than that, the entrepreneur life, especially in the startup phase, means long hours and uber focus on the work of building a business.

Building a business is like building a building. It takes a long time and a lot of work before that building is habitable. And… construction sites are always messy.

Audio Article – Artist Entrepreneurs

 

Artist Entrepreneurs

To an architect, his building is his art.
To an entrepreneur, her business is her art.
To an artist, her art is her life. To thrive, she also makes it her business.
~LeAura Alderson, author, entrepreneur, cofounder-iCreateDaily

Artist Entrepreneurs lead messy lives. We all know the stereotype of the messy artist. But more than that, the entrepreneur life, especially in the startup phase, means long hours and uber focus on the work of building a business. Building a business is like building a building. It takes a long time and a lot of work before that building is habitable. And... construction sites are always messy.

 

The Artist Entrepreneur

We use the term ‘artist entrepreneur‘ because the entrepreneur’s creativity is fully engaged in the art of business… in creating something from nothing. And because artists need to be entrepreneurs to grow their work in the world.

Entrepreneurs often don’t have time to also be Sam/Suzy Homemaker or Mr./Mrs. Fixit at home. Whether you are an artist or an entrepreneur, you are a creator, creating something from nothing.

And if you’re a creator, you need to build a business around your creative endeavor for it to survive and thrive. That’s what artist entrepreneurs do.

WARNING: Startup House.
Crazy Entrepreneurs Live and Work Here
Knock at your own risk.

Entrepreneurs often don't have time to also be Suzy Homemaker or Mr. Fixit at home. Whether you are an artist or an entrepreneur, you are a creator, creating something from nothing. And if you're a creator, you need to build a business around your creative endeavor for it to survive and thrive. That's what artist entrepreneurs do.

 

Imperfectly Messy Lives

Entrepreneurs lead messy lives, because they typically work seven days a week around the clock for weeks, months and even years on end. Often, without pay.

They may not get to events, or remember birthdays, or reply to those emails or social posts. It’s not because they don’t care. They do care. Deeply. They’re immersed in their vision of a better future, where there will be plenty of time to nurture all the people and things they care about, once they’ve arrived at the destination of their goal.

This is where many creatives give up. The entrepreneur knows that she may need to work for months or even years without income to bring her vision to life. The artist knows that he may need to create for years before his work is a commercial success or able to support him and his family.

Creators must create to come more fully alive. But you must also do the work.

Artist entrepreneurs are creators; bringing visions to life.
~LeAura Alderson, author, entrepreneur, cofounder-iCreateDaily

If you are friends with an entrepreneur in a new venture, you may not see her for a few years. Your author friend may seemingly disappear off the deep end of mutterings about characters and fantasy worlds. Your painter friend may show up with paint-stained nails if she shows up at all;, or he may need to shuffle clutter aside to find a place for you to sit if you drop in for a visit.

 

Artist and Entrepreneurs Need Deep Friends

If you are friends with an entrepreneur in a new venture, you may not see her for a few years. Your author friend may seemingly disappear off the deep end of mutterings about characters and fantasy worlds. Your painter friend may show up with paint-stained nails if she shows up at all; or he may need to shuffle clutter aside to find a place for you to sit if you drop in for a visit.

The creator in  you—or the creators in your life—need your faith, your support and your belief.

As a creator, you need to believe in yourself and do all that you can to ensure the healthy life of your offspring—your creations. You need to form a vision of your goal, write it down and proceed in that direction, daily.

If it’s an entrepreneur or creator in your life, your belief, encouragement and support can make or break their efforts and aspirations to bring their ideas to life.

Creators need deep and substantial relationships. The kind that—no matter the gaps in sharing of time and space—when you do come back together… when they surface from the depths of focused absorption, you can pick up right where you left off.

These are the lasting relationships… relationships of substance. Kindred spirits understand and are often similarly occupied in their own meaningful pursuits. Those are the relationship that withstand the ravages of time and the storms that may pass through, intact, fortified by the mutual love, respect and appreciation.

If the journey wasn’t challenging, the destination wouldn’t be rewarding. It’s the challenge that makes the greatness.
~unknown author

Normal is Out

Sure, there are some creatives who are naturally messy. They’re right brain all the way and don’t have strong organizational skills. But there are also those who let the order of their normal tidy housekeeping and home maintenance go in order to focus on their work… their lifeblood.

Gone are the dinner parties with the table decorated just so. The hours spent cooking and cleaning, entertaining, and then cooking and cleaning again. No more weekends shopping for the perfect bedspread or end table, or outfit.

No more hanging out discussion Games of Thrones, or whatever else may be the popular series obsession of the time. There’s just no time for that in the startup house. The creator has to let go of the distractions of the masses because he/she is too busy creating than consuming things that don’t move her closer to her goals.

The artist entrepreneur has to let go of the wonder woman complex, because she cannot do it all.

He has to let go of being Superman: perfect husband, dad, and boss. For the entrepreneur, it’s more than a matter of choice. It can be essential for their survival and that of their business. Like the new mom who forgets to wash her hair, or the new dad who leaves the house in his bedroom slippers, “normal” goes out the door.

“Normal”, doesn’t live here anymore.
~iCreateDaily.com

It’s not a Job, it’s a Way of Life

Now obviously, folks who work the proverbial 9-5 job, two working parents with kids have it tough too. Their weekdays are often hectic. The biggest difference is that entrepreneurs typically work through the weekends. They don’t clock in—or out—they work around the clock.

Often, entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial families feel different and outside of the norm of what their friends do. The “norm” is parents who are usually home and not working on weekends; they’re usually home at night too. They have regular holidays off and tend to work eight hour days.

Yes, of course they have stress and pressure from work and life too, everyone does. But it’s a different level. They usually have health benefits and a regular paycheck coming in even when they’re sick or on vacation. They do not have the pressure of the entire livelihood of their family resting on the success or failure of creating a business.

To the artist entrepreneur, work is her playground.

Entrepreneurs don’t clock in… and they don’t clock out. Building a business is a round-the-clock obsession!
~LeAura Alderson, author, entrepreneur, cofounder-iCreateDaily

The artist entrepreneur has to let go of the wonder woman complex, because she cannot do it all. He has to let go of being Superman: perfect husband, dad, and boss. For the entrepreneur, it can be more than a matter of choice. It can be essential for their survival and that of their business. Like the new mom who forgets to wash her hair, or the new dad who leaves the house in his bedroom slippers, "normal" goes out the door. "Normal", doesn't live here any more.

 

We can say the same thing for artists, because both are creators. The creative muse is ever at work… and at play.

Artists don’t clock in… and they don’t clock out. Creating, is a round-the-clock obsession!
~LeAura Alderson, author, entrepreneur, cofounder-iCreateDaily

Gone are the dinner parties with the table decorated just so. The hours spent cooking and cleaning, entertaining, and then cooking and cleaning again. No more weekends shopping for the perfect bedspread or end table, or outfit. There's just no time for that in the startup house.

 

For Creative Entrepreneurs, Their Business is Their Art

Entrepreneurs are creators of business. Artists are creators of the arts. Bring the two together and you’ll probably have wonderfully creative ventures, but a messy house, and things left undone. Entrepreneurs are like new parents who don’t get much sleep and who may forgo their usual self-maintenance details and anything regular. Non-essentials are let go soonest.

Everything but work, tends to get squeezed out of the equation, necessarily, because the beginning of any new business is like a newborn in ICU on life support: it needs around-the-clock attention and focus. Full time for entrepreneurs is often 12-16 hour days, seven days a week.

“Artists and entrepreneurs live dangerously. On the other side of 12-16 hour days, there’s no guarantee of a paycheck.”
~LeAura Alderson, author, entrepreneur, cofounder-iCreateDaily

She has to let go of the wonder woman complex, because she cannot do it all. He has to let go of being Superman: perfect husband, dad, and boss. For the entrepreneur, it can be more than a matter of choice. It can be essential for their survival and that of their business. Like the new mom who forgets to wash her hair, or the new dad who leaves the house in his bedroom slippers, "normal" goes out the door. "Normal", doesn't live here any more.

 

Entrepreneur Relationships

If you’re close to an artist entrepreneur, it can be a challenge. They can be so busy and immersed in their work that the relationship suffers. Unless you’re a part of their enterprise or find a way to join them, in which case it can be immensely rewarding for all.

In our experience, families that work together tend to stay together in more loving and cohesive relationships. Of course there are always exceptions. Ultimately, any relationship can excel or suffer in any scenario, depending on the people involved and their attitudes.

But often, relationships that bear the weight of the entrepreneurial burden together, thrive together, especially when they have a conscious and optimistic attitude. Moving forward focused on similar things, couples and families that work together tend to grow closer with more in common to strengthen their bond.

“Families that work and play together, stay strong together.”
~LeAura Alderson, author, entrepreneur, cofounder-iCreateDaily

Some of the most dynamic marriages—and families—are those who are working together in building their businesses or creating their art. We know of a number of couples, and two such families, who are an incredible inspiration to many entrepreneurs, creatives and parents in general. In fact, they know first hand and through their large entrepreneurial network, the needs of entrepreneurial families and how they may differ.

Famous Entrepreneurs in Families

Look at Richard Branson’s family. It’s a large family and all are still very connected and integrated into each others lives, from Richard’s mother, Eve Branson, and his wife, Joan Templeman, to their kids and grandkids.

 

The lovely Sir Richard Branson family remain very close, working and playing together, with mutual respect and admiration. Image from RichardBranson Twitter.

 

Other Famous Entrepreneur Families

  • Ralph Lauren, (Polo Ralph Lauren), daughter, Dylan Lauren, Dylan’s Candy Bar
  • Donald Trump  and daughter, Ivanka Trump, (The Trump Organization, plus Ivanka’s own name brand)
  • Tom Yeardye, (Vidal Sassoon), daughter, Tamara Mellon, (Jimmy Choo shoes)
  • Tom Velez, (Computer Technology Associates); daughter, Maria Vogt, (Ayuda Management)

Source: Forbes.com for more

 

Board Meetings for Entrepreneurial Families

Some of the most dynamic marriages—and families—are those who are working together in building their businesses or creating their art. We know of a number of couples, who are an incredible inspiration to many entrepreneurs, creatives and parents in general. In fact, they know first hand and through their large entrepreneurial network, the needs of entrepreneurial families and how they may differ.

Our friends, Jamie Lee and Jim Sheils with their four children, are an example of an entrepreneurial family who work, educate and play together. Jim and Jamie are hosts and co-founders of Board Meetings International—now called 18 Summers—a program that supports, inspires and strengthens entrepreneurial family ties.

Artist entrepreneurs live on the other side of different.
~LeAura Alderson, author, entrepreneur, cofounder-iCreateDaily

Jim & Jamie Sheils and children

Creator Couples

Artist Erik Wahl and his wife Tasha work together. Tasha does the business side while Erik is the artist. More recently, Tasha has also begun doing more of her art and product creation. The key is that they’re mutually supportive and encouraging, each of the other. We enjoyed our podcast interview with Tasha Wahl where she shares how they’re making it all work.

 

Keep Your Day Job

Artists and entrepreneurs often live in the fear of not knowing where the next paycheck will come from and if it will come in time. This is extremely stressful, so if possible, keep your job for as long as you can.

Keeping your job while starting your side gig means a lot longer work days and less sleep. However, far better that than ending up on the street or losing it all if your money runs out before your passion project becomes profitable.

As an artist entrepreneur, you won’t have time for many of the usual social activities. Find friends who are equally aspiring and you will lift and support each other.

To start a business and bring it to success takes a tremendous courage and fortitude. Same thing being an artist.

“Don’t let the modern meme of not being there for your kid’s game or recital guilt you. That’s upside down programming.”
~LeAura Alderson, iCreateDaily.com

Don't let the 'Disney syndrome' of not being there for your kid's game or recital guilt you. This is a topic for another article, but this added load is the last thing mom and dad need. Rather, kids can be taught to support their parents in their endeavors and to help with meals and around the house. That is the traditional role of children in families and communities.

A Perspective on Family Pressures

So whether it’s a marriage or a friendship, if you want to maintain the relationship while supporting them—and believe me, they need it more than they know—you may want to find a way to join them.

But if that’s not practical, please know that their absence of calls, texts, and showing up for events, invitations and just to hangout is not a slight. It’s survival for them.

The entrepreneur has entered a realm of battling dragons. In some cases he’s hanging on by his fingernails, doing all that he can to make it work… to not lose it all.
~LeAura Alderson, author, entrepreneur, cofounder-iCreateDaily

The Disney Syndrome

Don’t let the ‘Disney syndrome’ of not being there for your kid’s game or recital guilt you.

This is a topic for another article, so we won’t go deep on this one here, but this added load is the last thing mom and dad need. Rather, kids can be taught to support their parents in their endeavors and to help with meals and around the house. That is the traditional role of children in families and communities.

Traditionally, children grew responsible more quickly by supporting the family along with the parents. Rather than the parents struggling to shuttle kids to so many privileges at the expense of the parent’s time, money and workload, the kids pitched in to help with what the family needed most.

No where in nature, does the higher of the “tribe” or “pack”, cater to the whims of adolescence.”
~LeAura Alderson, author, entrepreneur, cofounder-iCreateDaily

Traditionally, children grew responsible more quickly by supporting the family along with the parents. Rather than the parents struggling to shuttle kids to so many privileges at the expense of the parent's time, money and workload, the kids pitched in to help with what the family needed most.

 

Self Esteem from the Inside Out

A child raised to be a productive member of a family business grows self esteem and a sense of importance from the inside out. Children with responsible roles develop perspective on their value and contribution to the whole.

Working together for the good of the family provides more parental connection and recognition than all the recitals or games a parent could attend.

“A child raised to be a contributing member of a family business grows self esteem and a sense of importance from the inside out.”
~LeAura Alderson, author, entrepreneur, cofounder-iCreateDaily

 

The Family is the ‘Why’

Children who learn the importance of their role in their family business endeavors will grow stronger in their sense of contribution to the whole. The child’s self-esteem and sense of responsibility come from the importance of their place and participation in the family structure.

The artist entrepreneur needs his family’s understanding and support now more than ever. And you can be sure that any man (or woman) of character, will value those who had his back. When he surfaces for air and gets his feet on firm ground, they can celebrate and recalibrate. He will be there for them where it counts most. He is there for them now, just not always present.

The entrepreneur’s ‘why’ is usually his family. He’s doing this for them as much as for himself.
~LeAura Alderson, author, entrepreneur, cofounder-iCreateDaily

Focused, not Flawed

A neighbor went through some transitions of the sort that made it seem like something was wrong with him. His long term relationship ended. He became reclusive and we hardly saw him at all.

Then he left his job and was holed up in his house all the time. I was concerned, wondering if maybe he was depressed and had spiraled into some kind of gaming funk or worse.

Turns out he was super immersed in an amazing entrepreneurial venture he started. He saw a void in a hobby of his and began to turn that into a business. Later, when we were able to catch up with him and hear more about all of this, we learned the real story.

It was amazing and inspiring. And yet to the outside world it could’ve appeared to be something bad or wrong going on.

If you’re an entrepreneur, you need to associate with people like you, who understand and support the intensity of your life during these startup times. And… yes… friends who understand if you lead a messy life. 😊

WARNING:
Startup.
Hard hat Zone!

The Startup House

Today’s work-from-home entrepreneurs are living in a startup house.

Their commute is from the bedroom to their desk by way of the kitchen and coffee. You may see them jogging by at odd hours, or walking the dog with earbuds in as they tune into an informative podcast on 1.5x speed.

You may see them burning the midnight oil with lights on late and again early. They may not answer their phone or the door if their heads are buried deep in their enterprise. They probably won’t be commenting much on social media, unless it is a part of their business.

Artist entrepreneurs need to be obsessively focused on their work for it to succeed. Immersion eliminates diversion.

If you’re a young single person, this could be a great time to building your business while still living at home, or to share a house—a startup house—with a couple buds who are similarly focused on building their business.

Perfect for Boomers and Seniors too!

If you’re an older single person, you could do the same thing: cultivate friendships of all ages with those who are doing similar work as you. Or, perhaps you know others in your age group looking to turn hobbies into business endeavors in their second half of life.

Singles of all ages can possibly share living space to save money and support each other while having fun and connection with like-minded creators pursuing work they love. You can also join social communities, such as the iCreateDaily Facebook group, for associating with others building creative endeavors.

Support is essential for creators to thrive.

Today, artists who want to grow their work in the world, must be entrepreneurs.
And entrepreneurs, must be artists. Artist entrepreneurs.
~LeAura Alderson

You, the Artist Entrepreneur

Creators must be in the business of building their business.

Hire others to help as soon as you can. Oursource those tasks that are challenging for you, so that you can focus on your strengths and create.  You cannot do it all alone, though in the beginning, you may have to wear all the hats.

You—your life—may appear messy. You may seem aloof and driven. Your friends may not hear from you on social media, except to post about your work, if at all. You’re a startup—an artist entrepreneur—working insanely hard to make your passion a go… to bring your work to life. Because that’s what it takes.

You will never regret every effort to do the work that matters to you. And you must do it… because it matters to you, you must do it.

Art is the act of doing work that matters while dancing with the voice in your head that screams for you to stop.
~Seth Godin, author, entrepreneur, visionary, founder AltMBA

Start. Sustain. Succeed. iCreateDaily!




Want to submit your photos, videos and/or article content for publication? We love to consider your contribution for publication! creators@icreatedaily.com